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Round 7 of the Arab Elite Chess Championship 2011: The leaders protected their lead, Samir Mohamed: Back to business

Nearly all the attentions were focused on the first board, where a very important duel was taking place between the local player GM Salem AbdelRahman (White) and the Qatari GM Mohamed Al-Modiahki. As was expected, The Samisch variation of the a King’s indian defense was transposed to the Benoni setup, in which the Qatari GM has scored a lot of points, not to mention the added flavor by his trainer the famous Russian GM Alexi Kuzmin. But what we tasted more strongly was the added cold touch of the Latvian GM Edvin Kengis, Salem’s trainer, who added a lot of positional approach to the Salem’s game. A very strong knight was installed on c4 square, dominating the central dark squares, including Black’s critical d6.

 Mohamed tried his luck in the ending, but the knight proved too strong to destabilize it, forcing him to part with a piece to stop Salem passed d-pawn. I can imagine the Emirati spectators when Black resigned.

As I said before, a GM is a GM. And that was proved again on the second board between GM Ahmad Adly (White) and Rashid Yaaqoub. A closed catalan was on the schedule. And this means a high positional game is undergoing. Although Rashd kept the balance due to his slight advantage on the queenside and his two bishops, Adly delved deeply into the position, exchanged Black dangerous pieces, to enter an ending with knight against bishop. The knight started galloping, which dazzled Rashid, and enabling the White king to infiltrate and collect some black pawns, and the game point.

I don’t know what happened with Sami Khader who faced with the White pieces Samir Mohamed on board 3. Just after 9 moves he gave the advantage to his opponent:

Samir played 9..Nxf2!! and didn’t let the advantage, and the game point,  slip from him during the remaining moves. With this win, Samir is on the 3rd position in the standing after round 7, with 4.5 points, 1.5 points less than the 2 leaders.

Just one mistake can be disaster. This was shown on the board of the game between Kamel njili (White) and Mohamed Tisir. A Panov attack derived from the Caro-Kann, transformed into Scandinavian-Alekhine hybrid, enabling Mohamed to at least equalize his game:

 Mohamed tried his luck in the ending, but the knight proved too strong to destabilize it, forcing him to part with a piece to stop Salem passed d-pawn. I can imagine the Emirati spectators when Black resigned.

As I said before, a GM is a GM. And that was proved again on the second board between GM Ahmad Adly (White) and Rashid Yaaqoub. A closed catalan was on the schedule. And this means a high positional game is undergoing. Although Rashd kept the balance due to his slight advantage on the queenside and his two bishops, Adly delved deeply into the position, exchanged Black dangerous pieces, to enter an ending with knight against bishop. The knight started galloping, which dazzled Rashid, and enabling the White king to infiltrate and collect some black pawns, and the game point.

I don’t know what happened with Sami Khader who faced with the White pieces Samir Mohamed on board 3. Just after 9 moves he gave the advantage to his opponent:

Samir played 9..Nxf2!! and didn’t let the advantage, and the game point,  slip from him during the remaining moves. With this win, Samir is on the 3rd position in the standing after round 7, with 4.5 points, 1.5 points less than the 2 leaders.

Just one mistake can be disaster. This was shown on the board of the game between Kamel njili (White) and Mohamed Tisir. A Panov attack derived from the Caro-Kann, transformed into Scandinavian-Alekhine hybrid, enabling Mohamed to at least equalize his game:

In this position, Tisir played 23..Qe4?? releasing the control of the d8 square. This allowed Kamel to play 24 Qd8+ Kg7 25 Qd4! To reach after few moves the following position:

The black knight is doomed. Black resigned after few moves.

The surprising Atallah Tamra, playing Black on the 5th board against Zendan Zindani, showed us his potential play. He played a nice maneuvering game, to reach an advantageous ending with Queen+Knight versus Queen+Bishop, resulted in winning a white pawn. But that was not enough to break the defense of Zendan. The peace was signed after White 114th move!!

A draw was also the result of the board 6 game between Ousmane douda (White) and Hussein Ayyad. What distinguished this draw is the first half point collected by the Mauritanian player.

A very tactical opening phase was seen on the 7th board between Fadi Eid and Badr Al-Hageri. They reached a middle game with some advantage to Fadi , due to the weakness of the Black king defense. The players entered the ending phase where Fadi possessed an active king, which was the critical factor in the fight between his knight and Badr’s bishop. A pawn ending resulted in which the white one is faster, forcing Black to seed the point.

Round 7 results:

Bo.   Name Rtg Result   Name Rtg
1 GM Salem A R  Saleh 2489 1 – 0 GM Al-Modiahki Mohamad 2564
2 GM Adly Ahmed 2605 1 – 0   Yaaqoub Rashid 2102
3 IM Khader Sami 2416 0 – 1 FM Mohammad Samir 2349
4 FM Njili Kamel 2329 1 – 0 IM Tissir Mohamed 2454
5 IM Al-Zendani Zendan 2396 ½ – ½   Tamra Attallah 2090
6   Daouda Sabar Ousmane 2097 ½ – ½ FM Ayyad Husain 2206
7 IM Eid Fadi 2381 1 – 0   Al-Hageri Badr 2130

 

Standing after round 7:

Rk.   Name FED Rtg Pts. TB1 TB2 TB3
1 GM Adly Ahmed EGY 2605 6 1 14405 27.5
2 GM Salem A R  Saleh UAE 2489 6 0 14764 27
3 FM Mohammad Samir SYR 2349 4.5 0 14498 21.5
4 GM Al-Modiahki Mohamad QAT 2564 4 0.5 14569 30.5
5 FM Njili Kamel TUN 2329 4 0.5 14164 24.5
6 IM Eid Fadi LIB 2381 3.5 0 14271 23.5
7   Tamra Attallah PLE 2090 3.5 0 14131 19
8 FM Ayyad Husain BRN 2206 3.5 0 14046 24.5
9 IM Al-Zendani Zendan YEM 2396 3.5 0 13764 22.5
10 IM Khader Sami JOR 2416 3 0 14784 30.5
11   Yaaqoub Rashid SUD 2102 3 0 14257 21.5
12 IM Tissir Mohamed MAR 2454 3 0 14074 26
13   Al-Hageri Badr KUW 2130 1 0 13589 21.5
14   Daouda Sabar Ousmane MTN 2097 0.5 0 13512 23

 

It is important to mention the tie-breaks used in the championship. The first one (TB1) is the results of the players in the same group. For example, in the first group, we have Adly and Salem with 6 points each. But as Adly beat Salem in previous round, Adly has one point for his TB1. The second one (TB2) is the sum of ratings of the opponents (without one result), and the third one is the known Buchhloz (Sum of the player’s opponents’ score).

Round 7 games:

(1) Salem,A R  Saleh (2489) – Al-Modiahki,Mohamad (2564)

 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.f3 0–0 6.Be3 c5 7.Nge2 Nc6 8.d5 Ne5 9.Ng3 h5 10.Be2 h4 11.Nf1 e6 12.Nd2 exd5 13.cxd5 h3 14.g3 a6 15.a4 Bd7 16.0–0 b5 17.axb5 axb5 18.Nxb5 Qb6 19.Rxa8 Rxa8 20.Na3 Qxb2 21.Nac4 Nxc4 22.Nxc4 Qb8 23.Qc2 Ne8 24.Rb1 Ra1 25.Rxa1 Bxa1 26.Kf2 Qb4 27.g4 Bd4 28.Bxd4 cxd4 29.Qb2 Qc5 30.Qb6 Bb5 31.Qxc5 dxc5 32.d6 g5 33.Nb6 Nxd6 34.e5 Bxe2 35.exd6 Bb5 36.d7 Bxd7 37.Nxd7 c4 38.Ne5 c3 39.Ke2 f5 40.Nc6 c2 41.Kd2 d3 42.Ne5 1–0

(2) Adly,Ahmed (2605) – Yaaqoub,Rashid (2102)

 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 d5 3.g3 e6 4.Bg2 Be7 5.0–0 0–0 6.c4 Nbd7 7.Qc2 c6 8.Bf4 Ne4 9.Ne1 f5 10.f3 Nd6 11.Nd2 Nxc4 12.Nxc4 dxc4 13.Qxc4 Nb6 14.Qd3 c5 15.Be5 Nd7 16.f4 Nxe5 17.dxe5 Qb6 18.Qc2 Bd7 19.Rd1 Rad8 20.Nf3 Bc6 21.Nd2 Bxg2 22.Kxg2 Qc6+ 23.Nf3 b5 24.b3 h6 25.h3 Rxd1 26.Rxd1 Rd8 27.Rxd8+ Bxd8 28.g4 g6 29.Kg3 Qd5 30.Qd3 Qxd3 31.exd3 Ba5 32.a4 a6 33.Kf2 fxg4 34.hxg4 Kf7 35.Ke3 Bd8 36.Nd2 h5 37.Kf3 Be7 38.Ne4 hxg4+ 39.Kxg4 Ke8 40.Nc3 bxa4 41.bxa4 Kd7 42.Ne4 Kc6 43.Nf6 Kb6 44.Kg5 Ka5 45.Kxg6 Kxa4 46.Kf7 c4 47.dxc4 Bb4 48.Nd7 Bd2 49.f5 1–0

(3) Khader,Sami (2416) – Mohammad,Samir (2349)

 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 dxc4 5.a4 e6 6.g3 c5 7.Be3 Ng4 8.Bg5 f6 9.Bh3 Nxf2 10.Kxf2 fxg5 11.d5 Be7 12.Kg2 0–0 13.Rf1 Na6 14.Bxe6+ Bxe6 15.dxe6 Nc7 16.Qd7 Qxd7 17.exd7 Rad8 18.Rfd1 Bf6 19.Rd2 g4 20.Ne1 Bd4 21.Rad1 Rf2+ 22.Kg1 Rxe2+ 23.Rxd4 Rxe1+ 24.Rxe1 cxd4 25.Ne4 Rxd7 26.Rc1 Re7 27.Nd6 d3 28.Nxc4 Nd5 29.Rd1 Nb4 30.Rd2 Kf7 31.Kf1 Ke6 32.Ne3 h5 33.Rf2 Rc7 34.Rd2 Ke5 35.Kf2 Ke4 36.Nd1 Rf7+ 37.Kg2 Kd4 38.Kg1 a6 39.Kg2 Nc6 40.Nf2 Ne5 41.Rd1 Rc7 42.Re1 Rc2 43.Re4+ Kd5 44.Rb4 Nc4 45.h4 gxh3+ 0–1

(4) Njili,Kamel (2329) – Tissir,Mohamed (2454)

 1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5 cxd5 4.c4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 6.Qb3 Bg7 7.cxd5 0–0 8.Nf3 Nbd7 9.a4 Nb6 10.a5 Nbxd5 11.Bc4 Nxc3 12.bxc3 Ne4 13.Ne5 Bxe5 14.dxe5 Nc5 15.Qb5 Be6 16.0–0 a6 17.Qb4 Rc8 18.Bxe6 fxe6 19.Be3 Qd5 20.f4 Nd3 21.Qxe7 Rf7 22.Qh4 Rxc3 23.Rad1 Qe4 24.Qd8+ Kg7 25.Qd4 Qxd4 26.Bxd4 Rb3 27.Rf3 Nb2 28.Rxb3 Nxd1 29.Rd3 Rd7 30.Rxd1 Rd5 31.Kf2 Rxa5 32.Bb6 Ra2+ 33.Kf3 1–0

(5) Al-Zendani,Zendan (2396) – Tamra,Attallah (2090)

 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 g6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Bg7 6.Nde2 Nf6 7.g3 b5 8.Bg2 Rb8 9.0–0 0–0 10.Bf4 d6 11.Qd2 a5 12.Rad1 Be6 13.Nd5 b4 14.Bh6 Nd7 15.Bxg7 Kxg7 16.b3 Rc8 17.Rc1 f6 18.c3 bxc3 19.Rxc3 Nc5 20.Rfc1 Rb8 21.Nef4 Bf7 22.Nd3 Nxd3 23.Qxd3 Ne5 24.Qe2 Bxd5 25.exd5 Qb6 26.Kh1 Rfe8 27.f4 Nd7 28.Rc7 Rb7 29.Rc8 Rb8 30.Rxe8 Rxe8 31.Rc6 Qd4 32.Rc7 Qa1+ 33.Bf1 Nb6 34.Rxe7+ Rxe7 35.Qxe7+ Kg8 36.Qe2 Nxd5 37.Kg2 Kg7 38.Qd2 Nb4 39.Qxd6 Qxa2+ 40.Kh3 Qxb3 41.Qc7+ Kh6 42.Qxa5 Qe6+ 43.Kh4 Nd5 44.Qd2 Qf5 45.g4 Qxf4 46.Qxf4+ Nxf4 47.Kg3 Ne6 48.Bc4 Nc5 49.Kf4 Nd7 50.h4 Kg7 51.Bb5 Ne5 52.Ba4 Nd3+ 53.Ke3 Nc5 54.Bb5 Kf7 55.Bc4+ Ke7 56.Kf4 Ne6+ 57.Ke4 Kd6 58.Ba2 h6 59.Bb1 Nc5+ 60.Ke3 g5 61.hxg5 hxg5 62.Bf5 Ke5 63.Bc8 Ne4 64.Bd7 Nd6 65.Kf3 Kd4 66.Be6 Ne4 67.Bc8 Nd2+ 68.Ke2 Nc4 69.Kf3 Ne5+ 70.Kg3 Ke3 71.Bb7 Nd3 72.Bc8 Nf2 73.Bd7 Ne4+ 74.Kg2 Kf4 75.Bc8 Nc3 76.Bd7 Nd5 77.Bc8 Ne3+ 78.Kh3 Nd1 79.Kg2 Ne3+ 80.Kh3 Kf3 81.Bb7+ Kf2 82.Bc8 Nd5 83.Bb7 Nf4+ 84.Kh2 Ne2 85.Bc6 Nd4 86.Bb7 Nc2 87.Bc6 Ne3 88.Kh3 Nc4 89.Bd5 Ne5 90.Bb7 Ng6 91.Bc6 Nf4+ 92.Kh2 Ke3 93.Kg3 Ne2+ 94.Kh3 Kf4 95.Bd7 Nd4 96.Kg2 Nf3 97.Be6 Nd4 98.Kh3 Kf3 99.Bd5+ Kf2 100.Bb7 Ke3 101.Kg3 Ne6 102.Bc8 Nc5 103.Bf5 Ne4+ 104.Kg2 Kf4 105.Bc8 Nd6 106.Be6 f5 107.gxf5 Nxf5 108.Bxf5 Kxf5 109.Kf3 Ke5 110.Kg4 Kf6 111.Kg3 Kf5 112.Kf3 g4+ 113.Kg3 Kg5 114.Kg2 ½–½

(6) Daouda,Sabar Ousmane (2097) – Ayyad,Husain (2206)

 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0–0 b5 6.Bb3 Nxe4 7.d4 d5 8.dxe5 Be6 9.Nbd2 Nc5 10.c3 Nxb3 11.Nxb3 Be7 12.Nbd4 Nxd4 13.Nxd4 Qd7 14.Nxe6 Qxe6 15.Re1 0–0 16.Qd3 f5 17.f4 Rfd8 18.Be3 g6 19.Bf2 Rab8 20.b4 Qc6 21.Bd4 Qc4 22.Red1 Qxd3 23.Rxd3 a5 24.a3 Kf7 25.Kf2 Ke6 26.Ke2 Rdc8 27.Rh3 Rh8 28.Rd3 Ra8 29.Rdd1 a4 30.Rab1 h6 31.g3 g5 32.Rg1 Rag8 33.Kf3 c6 34.Rbf1 Rg6 35.h4 Rhg8 36.h5 R6g7 37.Rb1 Rc8 38.Rb2 Bf8 39.Rbb1 Rgc7 40.Rge1 Be7 41.Re3 Rg8 42.Ree1 Rb8 43.Re3 c5 44.bxc5 Bxc5 45.Bxc5 Rxc5 46.fxg5 hxg5 47.h6 Rc4 48.Rh1 Re4 49.h7 Rh8 50.Rxe4 dxe4+ 51.Ke3 Kxe5 52.Rh5 Kf6 53.g4 Kg6 54.Rh1 fxg4 55.Kxe4 Rxh7 56.Rb1 Rc7 57.Kd3 Kf5 58.Rxb5+ Kf4 59.Rb4+ Kf3 60.Rb5 Rf7 61.Rxg5 g3 62.c4 Kf2 63.Kc3 g2 64.Kb4 g1Q 65.Rxg1 Kxg1 66.Kxa4 Kf2 67.Kb5 Ke3 68.a4 Kd4 69.a5 Rf5+ 70.Kb6 Kxc4 71.a6 Rf8 72.a7 Rh8 73.Kb7 Kb5 74.a8Q Rh7+ 75.Kb8 Rh8+ 76.Kb7 ½–½

(7) Eid,Fadi (2381) – Al-Hageri,Badr (2130)

 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.d4 exd4 5.Nxd4 Nxe4 6.Nxe4 Qe7 7.f3 d5 8.Bb5 Bd7 9.Bxc6 bxc6 10.0–0 dxe4 11.Re1 0–0–0 12.Rxe4 Qf6 13.Qf1 Bc5 14.c3 Rhe8 15.Be3 Rxe4 16.Qa6+ Kb8 17.fxe4 Qg6 18.Rd1 Qxe4 19.Bf2 Bc8 20.Qc4 Bb6 21.Re1 Qd5 22.Nxc6+ Ka8 23.Qxd5 Rxd5 24.Ne7 Bxf2+ 25.Kxf2 Rd2+ 26.Re2 Rxe2+ 27.Kxe2 Be6 28.a3 Kb7 29.Ke3 c6 30.Kd4 Kc7 31.Kc5 Bd7 32.b4 f5 33.a4 f4 34.b5 g5 35.bxc6 Be6 36.Nd5+ Bxd5 37.Kxd5 h5 38.h3 g4 39.hxg4 hxg4 40.Ke4 f3 41.gxf3 gxf3 42.Kxf3 Kxc6 43.Ke4 Kc5 44.Kd3 a5 45.c4 Kb4 46.Kd4 Kxa4 47.c5 Kb5 48.Kd5 1–0

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