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Bird Defense – Part 2-B

Now we will focus on Kasparov’s preference and aggressive 6th move: Bc4!

1.e4 e5

 

2.Nf3 Nc6

 

3.Bb5 Nd4

 

4.Nxd4 exd4

 

 5.0–0 c6

 

 6.Bc4

 

Kasparov’s choice!! I will concentrate my analysis on 2 moves: A. 6..Nf6 and B.6..d5, as 6..d6 is somewhat passive, allowing White to create a strong center after 7 c3!

  1. A.                                        6…Nf6

 

7.Re1!

[7.e5 d5! a typical reaction]

 [7.Qe2 trying to play on the e-file

7...d6

8.e5 dxe5

9.Qxe5+ Be7

 10.Re1 b5! a nice maneuver by Kholmov to remember!

 11.Bb3 a5

12.a4 Ra7!

13.axb5 0–0

Do you like the bishop on c1 or the knight on b1?, not to mention that some elementary tactics have popped up, like Bd6, followed by Bxh2+, and Ng4

14.b6 Qxb6

 15.d3 Bb4 with excellent game for Black. See game Geller!!! - Kholmov bellow.]

7…d6

 

8.c3 Qb6

[8...Ng4

 9.h3 Ne5

10.d3 Nxc4

11.dxc4 dxc3

 12.Nxc3 Be7

 13.Bf4 0–0

 14.Qd3 Be6

15.Rad1

 White has already centralized his rooks, putting pressure on d6-pawn, which give him the advantage, although as many Philodor and old-indian players know, Black's position contains a lot of hidden resources (pressure on c4 and b2), not to mention his possession of the 2 bishops]

[8...Be7!?   is very interesting, played by not less than Spassky!! Black sacrifices a pawn in order to damage White pawn 'structure.

 9.cxd4 d5

 10.exd5 Nxd5  

 

(10...cxd5 11.Bb5+ Bd7 12.Bxd7+ Qxd7 13.Nc3 0–0 14.d3 though complicated, still gives White some advantage)

11.Nc3 0–0

12.d3  

 

(12.Nxd5 cxd5 13.Bxd5 Qxd5 14.Rxe7 Bh3! with excellent compensation -The a1–rook and c1–bishop are crying to get out to freedom)

12...Be6

13.Qb3 Qd7

14.Bxd5 cxd5

15.Bf4 and White succeeded in liberating his bishop, obtaining a certain advantage (a pawn is a pawn. the d3 one is controlling the c4 and e4 squares, and the e-file is waiting White to double his rooks)]

 9.Qb3

 

 [9.d3 is weaker: 9...Be7

 10.cxd4 Qxd4

 11.Nc3 Ng4!

 12.Qf3 Ne5

 13.Qg3 Nxc4

 14.dxc4 Be6

15.b3 Bf6

 16.Bb2 Be5

 17.Na4 Qxb2

 18.Nxb2 with a draw in Gipslis-Tolush 1962.]

 9…Qxb3

 

10.Bxb3 dxc3

 

 11.bxc3 Be7

 

12.d4 and White is better due to his ideal center.

  1. B.                             6…d5

7.exd5 cxd5

 

8.Bb5+ Bd7

 

9.Re1+ Ne7

 

 [9...Be7? 10.Qg4!]

 10.c4

White is trying to develop an initiative, profiting from his better development.

 [10.Bxd7+ Qxd7

  11.Qh5!? 0–0–0!

  12.Qxf7 Nc6

  13.Qxd7+ Kxd7

  14.d3 Nb4 15.Na3 Rc8

 the pressure on the c-file gives Black enough play to equalize his chances]

[10.a4 a6

 11.Bxd7+ Qxd7

 12.d3 0–0–0

 13.b4 Nf5

 14.b5 a5

 15.Bd2 b6

 16.c3 Bc5

 17.cxd4 Nxd4

 is equal. That was played by Kasparov in his second game of his match against Khalifman in Moscow 2002. Later Kasparov improved his play (!!) by the main 10 c4.]

10…a6

 

 [10...Bxb5 11.cxb5

 Qb6 12.Na3

 doesn't solve Black's problems, nor does the following en-passant move]

[ 10...dxc3

 11.Bxd7+ Qxd7

 12.dxc3 an isolated d5 pawn is added to Black's bad development]

[ 10...dxc4

 11.Bxc4

doesn't solve Black's development, especially the bishop is eying to the juicy f7 pawn.]

[ 10...Rc8

 11.d3 Bxb5

 12.cxb5 Qd7

 13.Na3 f6

14.Nc2 Qxb5

 15.Nxd4

 doesn't give Black time to get some rest]

 [10...Qc7

 trying to castle long as soon as possible

11.Na3 0–0–0

12.d3 Ng6

 13.Bd2

 followed by Rc1 at the appropriate moment, doesn't solve Black problems either.]

 11.Bxd7+ Qxd7

 

12.d3 dxc4

 

                    [12...g6?!

                     13.Bg5±]

                   [12...0–0–0?!

                   13.Nd2 Kb8

                    14.b4

                              How to stop b5? no way!

                              14...dxc4

                    15.dxc4 Nc6

                    16.b5!

 with a crushing attack , as approved by Kasparov against Khalifman in their 4th match game in Moscow 2002]

                   [12...f6 trying to castle artificially

                    13.Qh5+ g6

                    14.Qh4 with a pressure 14...Kf7

                   15.Qxd4 Re8

                             (15...Nc6 is a possible try, trying to engineer some traps: 16.Qb6! (16.Qxd5+? Qxd5 17.cxd5 Nd4 winning the exchange!!; 16.Qh4 Re8 17.Bd2 Rxe1+ 18.Bxe1 dxc4 is at least equal for Black!) 16...dxc4 17.dxc4 Ne5 White still has the advantage)

 16.Bd2

 an extra pawn and positional advantage are enough reasons to convince Black to drop this variation.]

[ 12...Rc8

 13.Na3 f6

 14.cxd5 Qxd5

15.Nc4 with a fork threat on b6 is enough proof of White's advantage.]

 13.dxc4 0–0–0

 

14.b4 d3

 

 15.Bb2 Ng6!

 

 [15...d2? 16.Re2 White has the advantage as Black is going to waste a lot of times to activate and develop his pieces, though the d2-pawn will cause some headache for the first player. But instead of his hasty 15th move, Black can play more solidly:]

16.Nc3 Nf4

 

 [16...Bxb4 17.Nd5 gives a strong initiative for White]  

 

17.Qf3 Bd6

 

18.Nd5

 

 [18.Rad1 h5 planning Qg4, with complicated play]  

 

18…Nxd5

 

 19.cxd5 Bxb4

 

20.Be5

 

 and though it is Black now who has a extra pawn, his king’s protection is somewhat weakened, but the d3 pawn will, for sure, put in White a lot of pressure on his nervous system.

7.exd5 cxd5

 

8.Bb5+ Bd7

 

9.Re1+ Ne7

 

 [9...Be7? 10.Qg4!]

 

 10.c4

 

White is trying to develop an initiative, profiting from his better development.

 

 [10.Bxd7+ Qxd7

  11.Qh5!? 0–0–0!

  12.Qxf7 Nc6

  13.Qxd7+ Kxd7

  14.d3 Nb4 15.Na3 Rc8

 

 the pressure on the c-file gives Black enough play to equalize his chances]

 

[10.a4 a6

 11.Bxd7+ Qxd7

 12.d3 0–0–0

 13.b4 Nf5

 14.b5 a5

 15.Bd2 b6

 16.c3 Bc5

 17.cxd4 Nxd4

 

 is equal. That was played by Kasparov in his second game of his match against Khalifman in Moscow 2002. Later Kasparov improved his play (!!) by the main 10 c4.]

 

10…a6

 

 [10...Bxb5 11.cxb5

 Qb6 12.Na3

 

 doesn't solve Black's problems, nor does the following en-passant move]

 

[ 10...dxc3

 11.Bxd7+ Qxd7

 12.dxc3 an isolated d5 pawn is added to Black's bad development]

 

[ 10...dxc4

 11.Bxc4

doesn't solve Black's development, especially the bishop is eying to the juicy f7 pawn.]

 

[ 10...Rc8

 11.d3 Bxb5

 12.cxb5 Qd7

 13.Na3 f6

14.Nc2 Qxb5

 15.Nxd4

 doesn't give Black time to get some rest]

 

 [10...Qc7

 trying to castle long as soon as possible

11.Na3 0–0–0

12.d3 Ng6

 13.Bd2

 followed by Rc1 at the appropriate moment, doesn't solve Black problems either.]

 

 11.Bxd7+ Qxd7

 

12.d3 dxc4

 

                    [12...g6?!

                     13.Bg5±]

 

                   [12...0–0–0?!

                   13.Nd2 Kb8

                    14.b4

                              How to stop b5? no way!

                              14...dxc4

                    15.dxc4 Nc6

                    16.b5!

 with a crushing attack , as approved by Kasparov against Khalifman in their 4th match game in Moscow 2002]

 

                   [12...f6 trying to castle artificially

                    13.Qh5+ g6

                    14.Qh4 with a pressure 14...Kf7

                   15.Qxd4 Re8

 

                             (15...Nc6 is a possible try, trying to engineer some traps: 16.Qb6! (16.Qxd5+? Qxd5 17.cxd5 Nd4 winning the exchange!!; 16.Qh4 Re8 17.Bd2 Rxe1+ 18.Bxe1 dxc4 is at least equal for Black!) 16...dxc4 17.dxc4 Ne5 White still has the advantage)

 

 16.Bd2

 an extra pawn and positional advantage are enough reasons to convince Black to drop this variation.]

 

[ 12...Rc8

 13.Na3 f6

 14.cxd5 Qxd5

15.Nc4 with a fork threat on b6 is enough proof of White's advantage.]

 

 13.dxc4 0–0–0

 

14.b4 d3

 

 15.Bb2 Ng6!

 

 [15...d2? 16.Re2 White has the advantage as Black is going to waste a lot of times to activate and develop his pieces, though the d2-pawn will cause some headache for the first player. But instead of his hasty 15th move, Black can play more solidly:]

16.Nc3 Nf4

 

 [16...Bxb4 17.Nd5 gives a strong initiative for White]  

 

17.Qf3 Bd6

 

18.Nd5

 

 [18.Rad1 h5 planning Qg4, with complicated play]  

 

18…Nxd5

 

 19.cxd5 Bxb4

 

20.Be5

 

 and though it is Black now who has a extra pawn, his king’s protection is somewhat weakened, but the d3 pawn will, for sure, put in White a lot of pressure on his nervous system.

 

Ratmir Kholmov

Geller,Efim P – Kholmov,Ratmir URS-ch17 Moscow (19), 19.11.1949

 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nd4 4.Nxd4 exd4 5.0–0 c6 6.Bc4 Nf6 7.Qe2 d6 8.e5 dxe5 9.Qxe5+ Be7 10.Re1 b5 11.Bb3 a5 12.a4 Ra7 13.axb5 0–0 14.b6 Qxb6 15.d3 Bb4 16.Rf1 Qd8 17.Bg5 Re8 18.Qg3 Be6 19.Bxe6 Rxe6 20.Nd2 h6 21.Bxf6 Rxf6 22.Ne4 Re6 23.Qh3 Qd5 24.c3 dxc3 25.bxc3 Be7 26.f4 f5 27.c4 Qd4+ 28.Kh1 g6 29.Rab1 h5 30.Rb8+ Kf7 31.Qg3 fxe4 32.f5 Rf6 33.Rh8 Qxd3 34.fxg6+ Kg7 35.Rh7+ Kg8 36.Qxd3 exd3 37.Rxf6 Bxf6 38.Rxa7 Bd4 39.Rf7 d2 40.Rf1 Bb2 41.Kg1 a4 42.Kf2 a3 43.Ke2 a2 0–1

 

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